Books Coming to Screen in 2018

 

 

Writer: Teresa Madaleno

 

I know a lot of people who enjoy reading books before they become movies. The idea is to read first then watch the movie, compare and critique. Lately, I have had several readers ask me what 2018 books will be coming to a theatre near them. While I imagine I am missing some, here are the books know will be movies:

  • A Wrinkle in Time – if it sounds familiar it’s because it is the adaptation of L’Engle’s 1962 novel about good, evil, and time travel. Rumour has it that this Sci-Fi will star Reese Witherpoon, Chris Pine, and Oprah Winfrey.
  • All the Bright Places – is a novel about two teenagers helping each other through some very difficult times. Elle Fanning will be playing one of the lead roles in the movie version.
  • Ophelia – the story of Hamlet from the point of view of Ophelia, a book by Lisa Kline, will hit the big screen at some point in 2018. The cast will include Naomi Watts and Clive Owen.
  • Ready Player One – this book about an obsession with an online game leads to a massive treasure hunt in the online world. The movie version is expected to be thrilling, as well as humorous.
  • Let it Snow – is a novel by the same author who brought us “The Fault in Our Stars”. Does this mean you should bring a box of tissues to the theatre to see the movie version? Some insiders say, “Yes” the story of love just might bring you to tears.
  • Peter Rabbit – the classic tale of a rebellious rabbit comes to the screen in February 2018. It will star James Corden as Peter Rabbit, and Rose Byrne as Bea.

So if more than one of these sound appealing to you then, get reading. The year 2018 will be here before you know it.

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Hurricane Heroes vs. Scammers

Writer: Teresa Madaleno 

 

Hurricane Harvey took at least 70 lives that we know of at this point. That’s too many. One life is too much. However, as authorities work through what is expected to be a very long recovery process, they say they are “surprised” that that death toll was not higher.

The fact that weather forecasters were following and reporting storm activity as it made its way toward land and people heeded the warnings, made a huge difference in lives saved. If you have been watching or listening to news over the last few days, you have likely heard the stories about near-drownings and dangerous rescues. You have also likely heard about the real heroes. For example, the veteran Houston police officer who died on a flooded highway while trying to report for duty so he could help during the crisis. Of course, there were also the two volunteer rescue workers who drowned carrying families to safety. The people of Houston are broken, but they are proud – proud of their resilience and proud of their efforts to help their fellow man.

What is very hard to hear about amid all the tragedy and sadness is that this horrible weather event has stirred up much more than your typical storm debris; it has awakened the scammers. Sadly, there are people who take advantage is cases of tragedy. The Washington Post reports that scammers are using robo-calls to try to “fleece” hurricane Harvey survivors. Here’s an example: the scammer dials the phone and when the homeowner answers, they hear that their premiums are past due and they must send money “now” or have their flood insurance cancelled. How awful! These disaster parasites are in a class of their own, called “the lowest class”.

If you know anyone in Houston and Florida who is recovering from Hurricane Harvey or Irma, please talk to him or her about these parasites. One of the biggest scams experienced by storm survivors in recent years has involved dishonest contractors. They get survivors to sign a contract for repair work on a digital tablet; however, when they print out the work sheet, the bid is thousands of dollars higher than what the person originally signed. In some situations, survivors unknowingly assign FEMA disaster aid over to the scammer.

While we would all like to focus on the heroes, it seems it is the constant barrage of parasites that we have to keep watching for. They should be severely prosecuted.

A side note to anyone reading this – give generously to hurricane recovery efforts. There are different ways you can donate, including through the Red Cross and the United Way, as well as other organizations listed below.

http://www.redcross.ca/about-us/red-cross-stories/2017/red-cross-responds-to-devastation-caused-by-hurricane-harvey

https://www.unitedwayhouston.org/flood

https://secure.americares.org/site/Donation2?df_id=22188&mfc_pref=T&22188.donation=form1&_ga=2.27797372.1946876975.1503855566-771809081.1503855566

http://texasagriculture.gov

https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/feeding-texas

 

 

Reversing Brain Trauma

Writer: Teresa Madaleno

 

If you are familiar with competitive sports then you know that TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) is real. TBI ranges from a mild concussion after colliding with a teammate to something severe, such as a blow to the head when you are slammed into something with great force. These jolts to the cranium can lead to permanent brain injury and even death. Now, there is hope for traumatic brain injury patients.

As the mother of an avid hockey player, I have witnessed multiple head traumas at the rink so I was pleased when I heard about the recent discovery by scientists at the University of California in San Francisco. If you haven’t already heard the news, a team of researchers found that a new experimental drug could restore normal brain function in mice following two types of TBI’s.

Until now, medical experts thought there was no way to reverse cognitive decline and memory loss for those with traumatic brain injury. As for surgery, well that has to be carried out within hours of an injury to be effective. However, the University of California research team gave mice a compound and those mice developed memory capabilities similar to mice that never had brain injuries.

The drug that was administered during the study is called ISRIB and is pronounced, “iz-rib”. It was actually discovered back in 2013 by a biochemistry professor at UCSF. Doctor Peter Walter calls the findings with the mice “extraordinary”. He recently stated the following: “We think that ISRIB may uncover an untapped reservoir in the brain that allows damaged memory circuits to be repaired.”

What is particularly remarkable about the discovery is that in one phase of the study, the researchers waited until several weeks after the mice sustained the injury before administering the drug. Co-author of the study, Susanna Rosi indicated that animals with these types of brain injuries normally never learn well again, yet the drug ISRIB could restore ability to form memories even when giving the drug was delayed for four weeks after the injury; something that was considered impossible before.

While more research is needed before human studies can be conducted, the researchers have publicly stated that they have “high hopes” that the drug ISRIB can one day help those who have suffered brain injuries.

According to the U.S National Library of Medicine concussions account for up to 14 percent of hockey injuries at all levels of the sport. While prevention should be the name of the game, we all know that every season there will be players of various ages that will experience head trauma, which means we must support the advancement of research, like the work being done at the University of California in San Francisco.

Why Write Case Studies?

Writer: Teresa Madaleno

Everyone loves a good story right? Case studies are an effective, yet underutilized way to tell stories. As a business owner or sales director you might worry that case studies are too long and boring – that no one will read them. The truth is, if positioned well, case studies can paint pictures, evoke emotions, and lead to action.

Generally case studies start with a problem, outline various solutions and then offer proven results that showcase your product or service as the best solution for the problem.

So why should you consider writing a case study for your business?

  • They can position you as an authority
  • They can explain how to solve a problem
  • They can provide social proof
  • They can lead to spinoff content like blogs, newsletters, and videos.
  • They can generate sales

Case studies take time to develop. If done right, this means weeks or months. Of course, once the writing is done, you have to market the case study or should I say, maximize your case study conversions. You see that it is well worth the effort when your studies lead to interest in your products or services. Few people can become expert case study writers overnight, but I try to help get you started with my writing guide, which is coming out this fall so stayed tuned and I will let you know how you can get a copy.

Finding Your Customers

Writer: Teresa Madaleno

Most company executives understand that the better they understand their customers, the more likely their business will grow. The problem often becomes defining customer base. For instance, I often have clients who want me to “spread the word” about their products and services through both traditional and social media channels, yet I quickly discover they don’t have a good handle on who their customers really are.

You can have the best products and services. You can have the best messaging to explain those products and services, but if the right audience does not receive those messages then you haven’t accomplished anything.

Lets take an affordable cell-phone provider as an example – if someone asked executives at the phone company, ‘Who is your typical customer?’ they might say something like, ‘Well, our typical customer is Millennials and teenagers hooked on technology.’ I realize this is really general, but you get the point. Most people can define their target audience with some careful research. Knowing the age, gender, income, personality, likes, dislikes, and behaviours of the people who would most likely be interested in your product or service is crucial to your communication efforts. Of course, the wider your customer base, the better chance your message will do what is it supposed to do – encourage people to act.

Some companies are lucky in that they deal with a specific sector, but have a wide customer base. I will take up and coming energy company, Sparta as an example. Sparta focuses on advancing the capture, conversion and optimization of energy. If you asked their executive team, ‘Who is your typical customer?” They would likely say, ‘Almost anybody’. This is because Sparta is about more than one product or service; it is about using various tools and technologies to address the needs of customers in many different industries when it comes to reducing their energy consumption. This is the great advantage Sparta has – there is no limit to the Corporations potential market as the vision has been to constantly adapt and add products and services that clients need in order to help them remain competitive – be sustainable. When Sparta spreads their message they have a massive customer base to target.

No matter what sector you are in or how broad your customer base may be, giving careful thought to exactly who your customers are is more important now than ever before. We are living in an increasingly competitive world so it makes no sense to spend time, energy and money on crafting a message that doesn’t get seen or read by the right audience.

While there are many ways to examine your typical customer, one of the best ways to start is by looking at your current customers and asking yourself, what do they like, dislike or what works for them and what doesn’t. From there check out the competition, who is buying from them? Soon you will start to build what is referred to as an Avatar; a representation of what your client looks like.

Grounding – The impact on the human body

 

Writer: Teresa Madaleno

 

A few years ago I wrote an article for a health industry client on the subject of “Grounding.” The research I conduced at that time was really my first foray into examining the process of removing excessive charge from an object by releasing it into the ground. Walking barefoot is an example of grounding. Since that article I have learned a lot more about electrons playing a significant role in the cellular process that takes place in our bodies.

As reported in the U.S National Library of Medicine, multi-disciplinary research has indicated that electricity contact of the human body with the surface of the Earth produces interesting effects on our health. Studies show the effects relate to inflammation, immune responses and wound healing. Some research even suggests that grounding can prevent and treat chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. While this is still a relatively new area of research, what experts at the University of California and the University of Oregon have discovered is that grounding an organism can produce noticeable differences in concentrations of white blood cells and other molecules involved in inflammatory response. Physiology professors say grounding reduces pain and alters the number of circulating neutrophils and lymphocytes. Neutrophils are white blood cells important in the defense against infections. Lymphocytes are white blood cells that are part of the immune system. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B cells and T cells. The B cells produce antibodies that are used to attack invading viruses, bacteria, and toxins. Lymphocytes are high if you have an infection.

Grounding is really any system that allows for frequent contact with the Earth. This includes while sleeping, sitting at a desk, or walking outside. There are conductive systems such as sheets, mats, wristbands, ankle bands, and even adhesive patches. These applications are connected to the Earth through a cord inserted into a grounded wall outlet or attached to a ground rod placed in the soil outside.

A couple years ago a group of researchers, including some from the University of California and University of Oregon, looked at the physiological impacts of grounding from various perspectives. Their work has led to over a dozen studies being published in peer-reviewed journals. A peer review is a process that subjects an author’s work or research to examination and scrutiny of other top experts in the same field, before a description of the work can be published in a journal. The fact that the grounding research has been peer-reviewed and the actual studies show grounding could be an effective healing method has opened up new and promising avenues for research, particularly in the area of inflammation. Some suggest that it could have broad implications for health prevention and public health.

Despite the current research, all of this may still sound odd to some people, but think about it this way: We are all living on an electrical planet and our bodies transmit many frequencies that help run our muscles, our heart, our nervous system and our immune system. Many years ago it was perfectly natural to sleep right on the ground, and it was common to walk the Earth in bare feet. In our industrialized world, we rarely walk around without leather shoes and we do not sleep on the ground unless we are camping. In reality we are all disconnected or ungrounded. Considering that this disconnection may contribute in some way to illness may not be as far-fetched as many of us think.

Protein Supplements: Do you need them?

Contributing Writer: Michael Cameron

 

I was with a friend last week, talking about our diets and the challenges that I face with mine. Carbs, no carbs, low fat, high fat, and a million other variations were passed between us. Eventually we began discussing protein supplements and whether or not I should be using them. My friend, Rob Sinclair of Cross Fit Solid Ground, has a wealth of experience in the area of health and nutrition. Besides owning a Cross Fit gym, he also has a B. Sc. in Biology with a minor in Exercise Science, is a certified personal trainer, as well as a nutrition and wellness specialist, so when he speaks, I listen. For him, it is very simple – “Know your protein requirements, figure out if you’re meeting them and if you have a protein deficiency, then you should be taking some type of protein supplement,” he said.

Rob went on further to explain that my body uses protein to build and repair tissues and to make enzymes, hormones, and other body chemicals. Protein is ultimately an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood. He said if I wasn’t getting enough of it, my body wouldn’t be able to function properly and I may experience the following:

  • Food cravings,
  • Muscle and joint pain,
  • Slow recovery from injuries,
  • Fluid retention,
  • Regular illness
  • A cloudy mind

So, how much protein does a person need? The average person needs about .8 g of protein for 1 kg of body weight but there are certain exceptions and in fact, certain groups of people are susceptible to not meeting those needs, resulting in protein deficiencies. Check out the following categories below:

  • The elderly. As we age, our bodies become less efficient at processing our food.
  • Many sports require levels of high energy, strength and muscle.  Protein plays a key role in that relationship.
  • If you’re injured or ill, you need about 1.5 times your regular protein requirements to recover.
  • If you are stressed, you breakdown muscle and tissue faster than if you weren’t.
  • People that try to lose weight and cut calories.

Now I know how much I need and I know why I need it, but how do I figure out if I’m getting enough protein in my diet? I learned there are great meal tracking options to figure out if you are getting enough protein (I like myfitnesspal.com). If you use one and figure out that you’re not getting enough protein, there are a lot of really great options for increasing your protein intake. For instance, eating more whole foods (meat, dairy, fruits and vegetables) and fewer processed foods (carbs and sugars), minimizing stress by learning how to meditate or manage your anxiety through other means and finally, if you don’t like traditional sources of protein like meats, soy, peas, grains, then taking a protein supplement.

Contributing Writer, Michael Cameron is a martial artist and avid sports enthusiast who loves to spend time with his family, as well as write about sports and recreation in his spare time.