Children’s Books Every Adult Should Read

Contributing Writer: Keelin Mayer

If you are a book lover then you probably find yourself reflecting on your childhood reading from time-to-time. Well, just because you are an adult doesn’t mean you can’t relive the various themes and life lessons in those great books you read as a young person. Here are six books that every adult should consider reading again or for the first time, if they haven’t done so as a child.

Charlotte’s Web – An uplifting story of friendship, the tale of Wilbur the pig and Charlotte the spider allowed me to believe in something bigger than myself; adding an element of wonder and hopeful possibility to my childhood. I learned that it is important to stand up for what you believe in and to embrace the commonalities and differences between yourself and your friends.

Anne of Green Gables – The story of Anne with an “e” will forever be a part of my soul. A classic, magical and timeless tale of friendship, perseverance and love Anne taught me that it is important to build your own life path. It is a story that warms my heart and reminds me to never give up – regardless of the obstacles before you anything is possible.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone – Harry Potter walked me through the universal childhood challenges – the need to figure out who you are as an individual, the desire to be the same as everyone else and the realization that you can only ever be yourself, and ultimately the quest to find meaning in life. It is an entertaining book that captured my imagination and made tackling childhood fun.

The Secret Garden – A story of finding oneself by helping others, I found The Secret Garden to be an illustration of how a person can change when placed within new circumstances and offered new understandings of life. The metaphor of the garden is a visual component of the book that drew me in, allowing me to connect with the story through a personal familiarity of the beauty and tranquility of gardens. Opening your heart to the unexpected is the message I took away from the tale of Mary and Colin.

The Outsiders – The sad circumstances of the characters of this story were heartbreaking. Offering me a window into a realm of life unfamiliar to me, the poverty, underlying message of the need to fight to survive, and the lasting impact of split second decisions spoke to me of lost innocence. The book was a product of its time with a message that still resonates today.

The Story of Ferdinand – With a message of non-violence and pacifism, The Story of Ferdinand introduced me to the concept of internal struggles stemming from external sources. Ferdinand’s resolute determination to smell flowers instead of participate in bull fighting suggested that we all make our own destiny; it is not necessarily determined by the circumstances of our birth.

Reading at any age is an opportunity to step outside of the day-to-day routine. The life lessons learned from books read as a young person have the ability to stick with the reader, ultimately influencing their decisions and helping to shape their world view.

Contributing Writer, Keelin Mayer is passionate about writing, yummy food and nature. She spends her free time exploring forests and mud puddles with her husband and two young sons.

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