What not to do at work

Writer: Teresa Madaleno

Work can be incredibly satisfying. It can help us learn and grow in ways we never imagined possible. It can open our eyes to new ideas and opportunities, as well as lead us to financial rewards that help secure a good life outside of work. Let’s be honest though, not every day or every work experience is fantastic. Even those people who appear to have it all (at the office) are sometimes dying inside.

Whether you are one of those people who are silent and dying inside or someone who wears stress and frustration on the outside for everyone to see, there are certain things you must keep in mind when you are at work.

Both psychologists and employment experts agree that while you can’t keep everything bottled up inside all the time, you also have to be diplomatic in your approach to all that is office related.

Here are five things the experts say we should never do:

  • Speak or quit out of anger – it is not unusual to feel a wide range of emotions on the job, especially it you feel strongly about your work. Showing you care is a good characteristic, but losing it and acting out from rage always ends up being regretful. This behaviour is often grounds for firing and it simply makes you look unprofessional. I have to confess, when I was still a television reporter, I once screamed at a producer in front of everyone and while I did not get fired, I am certain I lost the respect of some people in the newsroom.
  • Lie – people tell lies when they think that somehow the truth will do them terrible harm. The truth about a lie at work is that you will likely have to do a lot of scurrying  to cover up your lie and in the end you will get figured out anyway. I remember the first time I caught a co-worker in a lie and I felt not only betrayed, but I no longer felt comfortable working with the individual. I just did not trust him.
  • Tell people you are unhappy – when you admit that you are miserable in your job, it doesn’t benefit anybody. It tells your co-workers and possibly your boss, if it gets back to him or her, that you don’t fit in. Additionally, it drags others in the office down.
  • Burn bridges – no one survives at work without other people. It’s all about relationship building and working together to make the project or company successful. We need each other so don’t burn bridges. Protecting work relationships can be a real asset.
  • Retreat within – while spewing your anger, frustration and negativity throughout the office is not the right move, keeping everything bottled up inside is not healthy. If you have a legitimate concern, discuss it in a professional way with a superior and be ready to offer up a possible solution. Also, think about talking to someone outside the office, such as a career counsellor or psychologist who specializes in work-related stress. Mounting stress can have both a physical and mental impact when it is not dealt with. Some people who are stressed-out due to work find that they become forgetful, which can hurt their work performance.

A study conducted in Canada a few years ago indicated that 51 percent of respondents felt work was a moderate to major stressor in their lives. In the United States the number of people calling in sick due to work-related stress has tripled in the last couple of decades. This is something that not only workers but also employers have to take a serious look at. Studies show that unhappy workers are 10 percent less productive.

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